Tuesday, October 21, 2008

Boston Globe: "Close Cadre of Friends?"

Does the Boston Globe have to sensationalize everything? I mean, really.
The state attorney general has launched an investigation into the financial dealings of House Speaker Salvatore F. DiMasi's personal accountant, according to multiple government officials, in a move that escalates the level of scrutiny of the profits and influence of DiMasi's close cadre of friends.
Look, there's no doubt some reason for the Attorney General's office to look into Richard Vitale's business arrangements. However, pinning this on Speaker DiMasi, when it hasn't even been fully pinned on Vitale, is spurious at best. Guilt by association is one of the sleaziest tactics a campaign could make, I've never understood why newspapers feel as though they're free from that taint.

Furthermore, does the Globe really need to resort to such terms as "close cadre of friends?" For starters, the article is about Richard Vitale, not any other "friend" of Speaker DiMasi. Moreover, would it have kill the Globe to stay out of tabloid journalism? Why not, "Richard Vitale is widely seen as a friend of Speaker Salvatore DiMasi who has, at times, benefited from the Speaker's influence," instead of sliming Speaker DiMasi for something Richard Vitale allegedly did (and that hasn't even resulted in a formal charge yet).

It may very well be that Speaker DiMasi abused the public trust, but as of yet there's no hard evidence. As previously mentioned, Richard Vitale hasn't been formerly charged yet. Furthermore, even if he is charged, his alleged crime - collecting lobbyist fees without properly reporting them - has nothing to do with Speaker DiMasi. For the Globe to continually insinuate that it does, right on the front page, is nothing short of throwing muck. It's not an act befitting of "the paper of record."

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ryan:
The speaker should resign. He is one step ahead of the law right now.

Ryan Adams said...

Did something inappropriate happen? Very likely yes. Was that something actually, tangently connected to Speaker DiMasi? There's absolutely, positively no hard evidence suggesting yes, especially on the first matter. The computer program was potentially more damaging, but the money was reimbursed to the state... so it's pretty much issue over.

What we have here is a newspaper trying to convict a public servant who - on the whole - has done a really top notch job, based on guilt by association. I don't find that acceptable. Where's the evidence? The Globe needs to show that to me. Until then, they need to make sure the focus of these stories - and their headlines - stays on Vitale and not the Speaker, because the Speaker is not responsible for the stupid decisions of everyone he's ever met in his life.

Anonymous said...

Gee, I wonder what office the Attorney General is running for? Why would I think that? Maybe it's time for Martha to evaluate her public conduct because she's becoming suspect herself. After Fells Acres, IMO, she was wrong and on the wrong side, her superficial deliverance of justice was glaring.
If the previous poster can't organize the facts, shame on him/her!

Anonymous said...

actually two newspapers are after mr speaker as they should be

Anonymous said...

So the computer program scandal is OK because the state got it's money back. Shouldn't have happened in the first place.

Ryan Adams said...

No, the fact that we got our money back doesn't make it okay, but trying to pin any illegal wrongdoing on the Speaker re: the computer issue is, as I said, spurious at best. Pinning any wrongdoing on the Vitale ticket issue is utterly ridiculous and merely guilt by association.

Anonymous said...

The guy is a thief

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